New MRI in Niagara County

Come visit our new large bore MRI at our Cambria office! Call to schedule an appointment today. We will be happy to accommodate you!

Screening at GLMI

For the safety of all of our staff and patients, you will experience a screening prior to your appointment and once again when you enter our facilities. We appreciate you help and cooperation during this time.

Multidisciplinary Approach To The Treatment Of Primary And Metastatic Liver Cancer

Great Lakes Medical Imaging (GLMI) will be presenting an Interventional Radiology Symposium focusing on Y90 on Jan 19th, 2019 at Santora’s 7800 Transit Rd in Williamsville, New York. We are seeking to build partnerships and lasting relationships with Healthcare Providers in our area to provide extraordinary outpatient procedures and treatment options. The symposium will offer the following:

Continuing Medical Education credits (5)

Discussion’s on:
• Chemoradiation in the treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinoma
• Locoregional therapies in the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer
• Surgical options and considerations for primary and metastatic liver cancer
• Transplant considerations for patients with primary and metastatic liver carcinoma
• Q&A with leading experts

If you are interested in registering for this event fill out the registration form below or please contact AnnMarie directly at 716-465-6816.

CME Registration

Please fill out this CME Registration Form 2019 and we will be in contact with more details.

Enter Your Name (required):


Free Vein Screening Night!

Do you have leg pain?
We’re having a free vein screening night on Monday, December 3rd at 4pm at Great Lakes Medical Imaging. We have helped many patients treat restless legs, pain, cramping, trouble with walking. Please speak to one of our friendly staff by calling 716-836-4646 and we can register you!

Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program

For more information about our Diagnostic Radiology Residency program visit UB Department of Radiology. 

TEACHING STAFF

Kenneth Pearsen, M.D.

Kenneth Pearsen, M.D.

UB: Chair, Department of Radiology, Clinical Professor
College: University of Pennsylvania
Medical School: Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons

Post-Doctoral Training:

Areas of Specialty:

Awards:

Douglas Drumsta, M.D.

Douglas Drumsta, M.D.

UB: Associate Program Director, Clinical Assistant Professor
College: Canisius College
Medical School: State University of New York at Buffalo

Post-Doctoral Training:

Areas of Specialty: Neuroradiology

Awards:

Phillip Baum, M.D.

Phillip Baum, M.D.

UB: Program Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: State University of New York at Syracuse

Post-Doctoral Training:

Awards:

Thomas Bevilacqua, M.D.

Thomas Bevilacqua, M.D.

UB: Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: University at Buffalo

Post-Doctoral Training:

Awards:

Charles Chung, M.D.

Charles Chung, M.D.

UB: Program Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Post-Doctoral Training:

Andrew T. Dunn, M.D.

Andrew Dunn, M.D.

UB: Program Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: Louisiana State University in New Orleans

Post-Doctoral Training:

Awards:

William R. Hampton, M.D.

William Hampton, M.D.

UB: Core Faculty – Chest, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: University of Rochester School of Medicine

Post-Doctoral Training:

Awards:

Thomas Lostracco, M.D.

Thomas Lostracco, M.D.

UB: Core Faculty – Ultrasonography, Clinical Assistant Professor
College: SUNY at Buffalo
Medical School: SUNY at Buffalo School of Medicine

Post-Doctoral Training:

Awards:

Jasbeer Makhija, M.D.

Jasbeer Makhija, M.D.

UB: Program Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: University of Bombay Seth Goverdhandas Sunderdas Medical School

Post-Doctoral Training:

Christopher Nicholas, M.D.

Christopher Nicholas, M.D.

UB: In Progress – Clinical Assistant Professor
College: Memorial University Of Newfoundland
Medical School: Memorial University of Newfoundland Faculty of Medicine

Post-Doctoral Training:

Areas of Specialty:

Awards:

Jason Pericak, M.D.

Jason Pericak, M.D.

UB: Core Faculty – Breast Imaging, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: State University of New York at Buffalo

Post-Doctoral Training:

Areas of Specialty: Breast Imaging

Awards:

Drew Pierce, M.D.

Drew Pierce, M.D.

UB: Clinical Assistant Professor
College: Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Medical School: SUNY Buffalo School of Medicine

Post-Doctoral Training:

Areas of Specialty:

Victor Regenbogen, M.D.

Victor Regenbogen, M.D.

UB: Program Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: New York Medical College

Post-Doctoral Training:

James Rinaldi, M.D.

James Rinaldi, M.D.

UB: Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: Georgetown University School of Medicine

Post-Doctoral Training:

Areas of Specialty: Body/Musculoskeletal Imaging

Michael Silber, M.D.

Michael Silber, M.D.

UB: Program Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: State University of New York @ Stony Brook

Post-Doctoral Training:

Awards:

Gail Stokoe, M.D.

Gail Stokoe, M.D.

UB: Program Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: New York Medical College

Post-Doctoral Training:

Michael Tabone, D.O.

Michael Tabone, D.O.

UB: Core Faculty – Nuclear Imaging, Clinical Assistant Professor
College: S. Degree – Biology, Magna Cum Laude State University of New York College at Fredonia
Medical School: O. – Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine Bradenton, Florida

Post-Doctoral Training:

Areas of Specialty: Nuclear Radiology

Richard Thomas, M.D.

Richard Thomas, M.D.

UB: Core Faculty – Pediatric, Clinical Assistant Professor
Medical School: Liverpool University, England (Medical School)

Post-Doctoral Training:

Areas of Specialty:

Four Signs You May Have Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that grow inside the uterus and affect 40% of women between the ages of 35 and 50. To learn more about fibroids and how we treat them, visit our fibroids page.

There are many potential symptoms that uterine fibroids may cause. Some women may have one symptom while other women may have them all! If these symptoms sound familiar, they may be due to uterine fibroids and you may want to see a physician.

Four Signs You May Have Uterine Fibroids:

1. Heavy Periods
If you have abnormally heavy periods, also known as menorrhagia, you may have fibroids. If you are soaking through one or more tampons or pads every hour or two, your periods last longer than a week, or your flow is disrupting your daily activities, you may want to consult with a doctor to see if fibroids are the cause of your heavy periods.

2. Fatigue
Fatigue may be caused by anemia in the setting of heavy periods. When your body loses too much blood, you may become anemic, meaning the blood can’t carry as much oxygen. This can make you feel tired.

3. Bulk Related Symptoms
If you feel like you are always having to urinate, getting up during the night to urinate, experiencing changes in bowel movements, or noticing abdominal girth, fibroids may be your problem.

4. Pelvic Pain
While there are many causes of chronic pelvic pain, uterine fibroids may be the culprit.

If you think you may have fibroids or you have been diagnosed with fibroids and would prefer a minimally invasive procedure over conventional surgery, schedule a consultation with Dr. Jon or Dr. Chris by calling (716) 836-4646.

Interventional Radiology Symposium on April 14th

Great Lakes Medical Imaging will be presenting an Interventional Radiology Symposium on April 14th , 2018. This is the first event of its kind for GLMI. We are seeking to build partnerships and lasting relationships with Healthcare Providers in our area to provide extraordinary outpatient procedures and treatment options.

The symposium will offer the following:

If you are interested in registering for this event, or becoming a sponsor, please contact AnnMarie directly at 716-465-6816 or by email at amauro@glmirad.com.

 


ACCREDITATION This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and Great Lakes Medical Imaging.
The University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
CERTIFICATION The University at Buffalo JacobsSchool of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences designates this live activity for a maximum of 4.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Stars align behind new residency program in Buffalo

By Brian Casey, AuntMinnie.com staff writer

September 19, 2016 — It’s not every day that a new radiology residency program starts up in the U.S. In fact, you’re excused if you can’t name the last time it happened. But the stars are aligning in western New York, where the local healthcare community is coming to together to start training future radiologists again at the University at Buffalo.

Dr. Kenneth Pearsen
Dr. Kenneth Pearsen, chair of the radiology department at the University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

On September 9, the university announced that it was restarting its radiology residency program at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The program had closed more than 10 years ago after operating under an accreditation cloud for several years.

And in an intriguing twist, the university disclosed that the program would be staffed and led by radiologists from a local radiology group, Great Lakes Medical Imaging, which agreed to step in and help fill out the ranks of academic faculty.

“I don’t think there is a better example of how a community comes together to fill a need,” said Dr. Kenneth Pearsen, president of Great Lakes Medical Imaging and chair of the new radiology department. “There was a huge need for radiology residency education in this community that had to be filled, and we got it done.”

Hitting rock bottom

The university’s radiology program hit rock bottom in 2006, when the school voluntarily withdrew from the accreditation program maintained by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), which is required for all U.S. residency programs. That move capped years of decline at the program, which suffered from a lack of resources, funding, and qualified faculty.

Great Lakes Medical Imaging had been brought in two years before the program shut down, first to read film and then to help teach residents at the program, Pearsen said. For the next two years, seven out of eight residents passed their boards, but university officials went ahead with plans to shut the program down in 2006.

Although the program was moribund, there was talk of reviving it some day. There was still an acute need for radiology residency education in western New York; other medical residency departments at the university needed to offer their residents instruction in radiology, for example. While informal talks were held, nothing concrete came of it, Pearsen said.

Momentum began to build in 2011, as western New York saw major changes in how healthcare delivery was set up in the region. At least one hospital was shut down, and two of the area’s major healthcare providers — Kaleida Health and Erie County Medical Center — were nudged into a partnership called Great Lakes Health System, designed to deliver a more integrated healthcare network. The partnership also includes the University at Buffalo.

Dr. Roseanne Berger
Dr. Roseanne Berger, senior associate dean for graduate medical education at the University at Buffalo.

The university also still had an urgent need for radiologist training, according to Dr. Roseanne Berger, senior associate dean for graduate medical education at the university. After the program’s shutdown, the university had retained three academic radiologists and two medical physicists who participated in training medical residents in other programs in imaging, but there are major advantages to providing a radiology residency program on its own, she said.

“Radiology and imaging in general is an important part of the practice of medicine in multiple specialties,” Berger told AuntMinnie.com. “We train residents in 63 different specialties. I think their training would be enhanced by the availability of academic radiologists who would not only teach residents in radiology but also residents in other specialties that use imaging.”

For example, the Buffalo area has become a center of excellence in endovascular neurosurgery, but the university can’t offer fellowship training programs in the discipline without a radiology residency program. Radiology in the area is the missing leg in a troika that includes neurology and neurosurgery; once it is in place, the university will be able to apply for ACGME accreditation of an endovascular surgery program, Berger said.

Starting with a blank slate

With the stars beginning to align, the university again approached Great Lakes Medical Imaging about reviving the radiology program, with Pearsen at its helm and the group’s radiologists serving as faculty. This time, the group picked up the task, after receiving assurances by the university that they could maintain much of their independence.

“We were taking a large private group and adapting it to a university practice plan,” Pearsen told AuntMinnie.com. “Members of our group had a vested interest in making sure they weren’t going to be swallowed up by the university. They wanted the efficiency of a private practice while providing the research, education, and teaching that the university needed.”

Great Lakes Medical Imaging has begun working with the University at Buffalo to build a new program from the ground up in collaboration with all the stakeholders in the region, a list that includes Kaleida Health and Great Lakes Health. The opportunity to start a new program from scratch is invigorating, Pearsen believes.

“Rather than everyone sticking to a decades-old template, everyone sat in a room with a blank slate and said, ‘OK, how do we do this?’ ” Pearsen said.

In addition to faculty provided by Great Lakes Medical Imaging’s roster of 35 radiologists, the University at Buffalo has committed to provide eight to nine staff members at the assistant or associate professor level whose positions are funded by the state. Funds will also be provided for research, Pearsen said.

The new program will also receive dedicated space, an entire area of Buffalo General Medical Center that will accommodate 16 residents and 10 new staff members, as well as associated medical library, lounges, and call room necessary for a vibrant residency program, according to Pearsen.

Pearsen credits the administration of the University at Buffalo for crafting an arrangement that makes it desirable for radiologists from a private group to engage in teaching without experiencing onerous burdens.

“In the past, if you were volunteer faculty, you’d have to come in on your own and get nothing,” he said. “The university is giving us value in return for the time we are devoting to teaching.”

Pearsen, his colleagues, and the university are currently engaged in the nitty-gritty of setting up the new program, which includes finding instructors for all nine major areas of radiology, from bone imaging to neuroradiology. He believes that the program will be ready to apply for ACGME accreditation by the spring of 2017, have accreditation secured by that summer, and start interviewing medical students for the academic year that begins in July 2018.

The program will start with a class of four residents, adding another four each year to a full complement of 16.

Strengthening job market?

The relaunch of the radiology residency at the University at Buffalo comes at a time when the job market for radiologists is showing signs of returning to health. This follows nearly a decade in which radiologist jobs were scarce, and when many industry observers felt that things would be improved if a few residency programs were shut down.

Pearsen believes that supply and demand for radiologist has always waxed and waned, but in the immediate future there will be demand. And long-term trends such as value-based care will only help.

“The future medical environment is going to move from fee for service to managed care. There will be a lot fewer specialties competing in the imaging space, and we are already seeing that,” he said. “People will be quite content to let radiology handle imaging in that environment, and we see the demand for imaging growing.”

Univ. at Buffalo revives radiology residency program
The University at Buffalo is reviving its radiology residency program, which has been shuttered since closing in 2006.
SUNY Buffalo residency program closes doors
The radiology residency program at the State University of New York at Buffalo will shut down by the end of 2008, according to school officials.


Copyright © 2016 AuntMinnie.com

UB adds 35 radiologists from Great Lakes Medical Imaging

35 radiologists to join Jacobs School faculty
on September 9, 2016 – 10:44 AM

Thirty-five radiologists from Great Lakes Medical Imaging are joining the University at Buffalo’s Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, a first step toward reviving the school’s medical residency program in radiology that ended 10 years ago.

The move provides a major boost to both the school’s radiology department, which had just a handful of full-time faculty, and the university’s UBMD Radiology practice plan, which had just one radiologist, UB officials said. The Great Lakes Medical Imaging radiologists will treat patients through UBMD Radiology.

The new arrangement eventually will bring more radiologists into the local pool of doctors and will give area patients better access to radiology services at outpatient clinics, at Buffalo General Medical Center and at Erie County Medical Center, according to the university.

“This is a transformation and a renaissance for the department of radiology, to have a new chair and 35 radiologists that will engage in the education of our students and allow us to re-establish a residency program and to be excellent caregivers as part of the larger UBMD physician workforce,” Dr. Michael E. Cain, vice president for health sciences at UB and dean of the Medical School, said in an interview.

UB officials said the move wasn’t possible without the cooperation of the members of the Great Lakes Health System – the university, the Kaleida Health hospital network and ECMC – a body created by a state commission in 2006 to encourage regional health care planning.

The 35 practicing radiologists from Great Lakes Medical Imaging join the Medical School’s radiology department, which previously had about five full-time faculty, Cain said. Two are Ph.D.s who conducted research, two practiced at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center and one practiced through UBMD Radiology, he said.

The 35 new faculty members will practice through UBMD Radiology. The practice plan will provide radiology services to Kaleida Health’s Buffalo General, as Great Lakes has done for a number of years. And the new agreement makes UBMD Radiology the sole provider of those services at ECMC, where Great Lakes Medical Imaging had been named the official diagnostic imaging provider in September 2015.

Great Lakes Medical Imaging sites will remain open under that company’s name, Cain said. There are seven outpatient locations, including five in Buffalo Niagara, according to the company’s website.

“You add all these sites together, if you go there you will have your X-ray interpreted, and you will be cared for, by a UBMD Radiology physician,” Cain said.

A key goal of the move is to restart the school’s training program in radiology. UB said it voluntarily withdrew the program from the national accreditation process conducted by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education in 2006, following the departure of several faculty members.

Residency programs provide training in a medical or surgical specialty for graduates of a medical school. The programs usually run from three to seven years, according to the university.

UB officials said they plan to start the residency application process this year with a goal of enrolling the department’s first class of radiology residents in summer 2018. Once the program is up and running, the program would bring in classes of between seven and nine residents each year, Cain said.

The addition of the 35 new faculty also will boost the clinical research performed in the department, Cain said.

UB has appointed Dr. Kenneth D. Pearsen, the co-founder and former president of Great Lakes Medical Imaging, chair of the Medical School’s radiology department and president of the UBMD Radiology practice plan. Dr. Angelo DelBalso, who served as chair of the department, has returned to the faculty full time.

Cain said UB will invest $1 million in its expanded radiology department, primarily for salaries of some of the new members and support for research and education. The money will come from the UB Foundation, the State University of New York Research Foundation, revenue from the practice plan and operating funds.